The Aftermath

This page covers the period from the sixth day after the sinking through to 1941.

The story of the loss of Athenia was one that would not go away but by 8 September 1939 the coverage of the sinking started to reduce.

8 September 1939

The Times reported a visit to Glasgow by the son of the American Ambassador to 'look after the interests of the American survivors of the Athenia disaster'. The Ambassador was Joseph P. Kennedy and the son in question was John Fitzgerald Kennedy the future US president.

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Cutting from page 3 of The Times 8 September 1939 [43]

Note: JFK came to England in 1938 to work with his father in the American Embassy. In 1939 he embarked on a tour of Europe, Russia and the Middle East. His last visits were to Czechoslovakia and Germany before arriving back in London on 1 September 1939 - the day Germany invaded Poland. He was in the House of Commons on 3 September 1939 to hear speeches supporting the UK declaration of war with Germany and, after helping the American victims of the sinking of Athenia, he returned to the US by aeroplane.


The Times reported the return of Captain Cook and 82 members of Athenia’s crew to Glasgow after their landing at Galway.

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Cutting from page 3 of The Times 8 September 1939 [43]


The Times also reported demands being made to Mr. J.F. Kennedy by US survivors for a convoy to escort them back to the US. He was non-committal but promised to brief his father.

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Cutting from page 3 of The Times 8 September 1939 [43]


Kennedy got a pretty rough ride when he met US survivors according to the Daily Record with them insisting on a convoy to take them home.

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Cuttings from the Daily Record 8 September 1939 [10]


The Aberdeen Press and Journal had a photo of Jack Kennedy with US survivors at a Glasgow hotel.

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Cutting from the Aberdeen Press and Journal 8 September 1939 [3]


The Times reported a revision to the expected number of deaths to 128.

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Cutting from page 3 of The Times 8 September 1939 [43]


The Times also described the proposed counter-measures including the use of convoys. There are some reassuring noises about the Navy bringing the situation under control.

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Cutting from page 4 of The Times 8 September 1939 [43]

9 September 1939

This day The Times announced the imminent publication of the official US reports and its view of some of the expected content.

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Cuttings from page 10 of The Times on 9 September 1939 [43]


The Times stated its view that Germany was going to repeat the submarine operations of WW1 with a "sink merchant ships on sight" policy. It also rather optimistically predicts that the effects of the German campaign will reduce once the convoy system was fully implemented.

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Cuttings from page 10 of The Times on 9 September 1939 [43]


On 9 September the first reports with definite information about survivors were published. The Times carried a list of the names of survivors that had been rescued by City of Flint.

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Cutting from page 10 of The Times on 9 September 1939 [43]


The Times also reported on the arrangements being made for Canadian survivors.

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Cutting from page 10 of The Times on 9 September 1939 [43]

11 September 1939

The Times confirmed the arrival in Glasgow of the survivors landed at Galway.

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Cutting from page 10 of The Times 11 September 1939 [43]


The Times also reported the death of a Canadian child who had survived the sinking. It also mentions that liners will no longer be scheduled or information posted about arrivals and departures.

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Cutting from page 10 of The Times 11 September 1939 [43]


The Northern Whig included a photo of survivors being entertained at a Glasgow hotel

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Cutting from The Northern Whig 11 September 1939 [27]

13 September 1939

The Daily Record reported that Sir Harry Lauder had entertained survivors at the Banqueting Hall at Glasgow

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Cutting from the Daily Record 13 September 1939 [10]


The Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette reported the expected arrival of US liner Orizaba which had been chartered to take US survivors back to the States.

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Cutting from The Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette 13 September 1939 [34]

14 September 1939

The Times reported the arrival of a chartered liner to repatriate the 250 US survivors of the Athenia sinking.

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Cutting from page 4 of The Times 14 September 1939 [43]


The Ormskirk Advertiser reported the rescue of a Mr. T Quine of Halsall and hoped that his wife might be alive. Sadly this was not the case and she appeared on a subsequent casualty list.

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Cutting from The Ormskirk Advertiser on 14 September [44]


The Daily Herald reported the arrival of survivors taken on City of Flint at Halifax Nova Scotia and their ridicule of German claims that one of their submarines was not responsible.

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Cutting from The Daily Herald 14 September 1939 [8]


Movietone News produced a newsreel item showing survivors arriving on City of Flint. Click the play button to view it:

15 September 1939

The Times reported the arrival of survivors taken on board City of Flint at Halifax Nova Scotia.

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Cutting from page 7 of The Times 15 September 1939 [43]


Amidst the death and destruction, the Catholic Standard appears to have been more concerned with a complaint by a priest on board Athenia that he had struggled to get a room in which to say Mass!

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Cutting from the Catholic Standard 15 September 1939 [7]

16 September 1939

The Falkirk Herald reported that flags would be flown at half mast across the country on the day of the funeral of Margaret Hayworth - the child who had died after being rescued from Athenia and taken to Halifax aboard City of Flint.

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Cutting from the Falkirk Herald 16 September 1939 [15]


The Sphere included a full page article about Athenia and included artists impressions of what had happened when the torpedo struck and the rescue and a photo of the Knute Nelson arriving at Galway Bay with survivors. Also some clearer survivor photos.

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Cutting from The Sphere on 16 September 1939 [33]

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Cutting from The Sphere on 16 September 1939 [33]

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Cuttings from The Sphere on 16 September 1939 [33]


The Illustrated London news carried a photo of an injured boy being helped ashore at Galway from Knute Nelson on its front cover. It also had several artist impressions of lifeboats being launched and survivors crowded into lifeboats that are not included here.

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Cutting from The Illustrated London News 16 September 1939 [18]


The Imperial War Museum has the following photo:

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A young child wrapped in a blanket is assisted by a member of the Army Medical Corps onboard the Norwegian vessel Knute Nelson after its arrival in Galway harbour, Ireland. (IWM catalogue No. HU 51015) [47]

19 September 1939

The Times reported that 28 US Nationals were unaccounted for.

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Cutting from page 7 of The Times 19 September 1939 [43]


The Lincolnshire Echo, like many other newspapers, reported that the Orizaba had left the Clyde with 150 US citizen survivors from Athenia.

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Cutting from the Lincolnshire Echo 19 September 1939 [20]

20 September 1939

The Times reported the departure of Orizaba with the US survivors and other passengers.

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Cutting from page 10 of The Times 20 September 1939 [43]

22 September 1939

The newspaper coverage of the sinking of Athenia was beginning to decrease at last - not least because of the number of other ships that had been sunk and other war news. The Lancaster Guardian though carried an interesting article about a Toronto citizen with relatives in Lancaster that had been on the ill-fated ship.

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Cutting from the Lancaster Guardian 22 September 1939 [19]

23 September 1939

The Times was a bit slow off the mark but also reported that Orizaba had departed Galway after picking up more US survivors and other passengers.

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Cutting from page 8 of The Times 23 September 1939 [43]


British Pathé produced a newsreel item showing survivors leaving for the US on Orizaba. Click the play button to view it.

26 September 1939

Report of Interview with Captain Cook - Master of Athenia

Cook gave a statement to the Casualty and Statistical Section of the Trade Division and I took a copy of it during a visit to the National Archives at Kew. In it he describes the launching of the boats and says they were all got away although with difficulty in some cases. The report doesn't include much detail.

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Photos of Captain Cook's statement from the National Archives. [32]

28 September 1939

The Times provided a breakdown of the nationalities of those aboard Athenia when she was sunk. The presence of 28 Germans exposes the nonsense of some of the propaganda proceeding from Berlin at a later date.

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Cutting from page 10 of The Times 28 September 1939 [43]

6 October 1939

The Manchester Evening News, and other newspapers, carried a very strange report that Grand Admiral Raeder had warned the US Government that the US vessel Iroquois would 'sink through a repetition of the circumstances which marked the loss of the steamship Athenia'. This is the first time I have come across this report and it implies that Raeder had either willingly, or through manipulation by the Nazi rulers, taken part in the lie about the cause of Athenia's loss. The vessel in fact arrived safely - escorted by destroyers and flying boats.

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Cutting from Manchester Evening News 6 October 1939. [23]

10 October 1939

Over a month after the sinking, this is the first media report I have found providing a list of those reported missing. You can access a searchable transcription of this list on the Remembering Athenia page of this website HERE.

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Cutting from page 10 of The Times 10 October 1939 [43]

14 October 1939

The Times noted the gratitude of survivors for the hospitality afforded to them.

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Cutting from page 5 of The Times 14 October 1939 [43]

17 October 1939

The Times reported that Donaldson Atlantic Line had made a payment towards the cost of returning survivors to the US

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Cutting from page 8 of The Times 17 October 1939 [43]

21 October 1939

The German propaganda machine continued to push the story about 'Churchill sinking Athenia' and an article covering their latest statements on the subject were published in the Exeter newspaper Express and Echo.

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Cutting from the Express and Echo 21 October 1939 [14]


The Illustrated London News had a reproduction of a moving painting of the evacuation of Athenia by the Cornish painter Arthur James Wetherall Burgess.

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Cutting from the Illustrated London News 21 October 1939 [18]

23 October 1939

The Times reported a rabid outburst by Joseph Goebbels, the German Minister of Propaganda and National Enlightenment, who was trying to convince the world (and the German population) that Churchill was to blame for the sinking which he says was done by three British Destroyers.

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Cutting from page 7 of The Times 23 October 1939 [43]


On the same day, the German newspaper Völkischer Beobachter, a mouthpiece of the Nazi regime, carried the headline "Churchill Sank the Athenia" on its front page. Page 3 of the same edition carried a picture of Athenia and the following item

The above picture shows the proud 'Athenia', the ocean giant, which was sunk by Churchill's crime. One can clearly see the big radio equipment on board the ship. But nowhere was an SOS heard from the ship. Why was the 'Athenia' silent? Because her captain was not allowed to tell the world anything. He very prudently refrained from telling the world that Winston Churchill attempted to sink the ship, through the explosion of an infernal machine. He knew it well, but he had to keep silent.

Nearly fifteen hundred people would have lost their lives if Churchill's original plan had resulted as the criminal wanted. Yes, he longingly hoped that the one hundred Americans on board the ship would find death in the waves so that the anger of the American people, who were deceived by him, should be directed against Germany as the presumed author of the deed. It was fortunate that the majority escaped the fate intended for them by Churchill.

Our picture on the right shows two wounded passengers. They were rescued by the freighter, 'City of Flint', and as can be seen here, turned over to the American coast guard boat 'Gibb' for further medical treatment. They are an unspoken accusation against the criminal Churchill. Both they and the shades of those who lost their lives call him before the Tribunal of the world and ask the British people, 'How long will the office, one of the richest in tradition known to Britain's history, be held by a murderer?'"

27 October 1939

Survivor stories were still emerging and the Arbroath Herald and Advertiser carried a harrowing description of the fate of those who had been in the lifeboat that had been smashed by the propellor of Knute Nelson.

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Cutting from the Arbroath Herald and Advertiser 27 October 1939 [4]

18 November 1939

The Times had a letter to the editor about the assistance given to survivors by the owner of Southern Cross.

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Cutting from page 4 of The Times 18 November 1939 [43]

23 November 1939

Report of Interview with Mr. Copeland - Chief Engineer of Athenia

Mr. Copeland gave a statement to the Casualty and Statistical Section of the Trade Division on 23 November 1939. The images below are from photographs I took of the original document which is held at the National Archives at Kew. In it he sugggests that there was a second explosion which he thought was caused by a shell. He notes that the ship listed to port and the lights all went out - presumably due to damage caused in the engine room. Copeland reports that he saw a submarine which rapidly disappeared. There were 26 lifeboats that had to be launched from 7 davits - a dangerous restriction but presumably considered acceptable up until that time. The disembarkment seems to have gone smoothly with no panic. Copeland went back to the ship to rescue an unconscious passenger. He was later awarded an OBE for his handling of the situation.

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Photos of Mr. Copeland's statement. [32]

Remainder of 1939

There continued to be passing references to Athenia through to the end of December of the year but nothing of any significance appeared. Newspaper writers seemed obliged to put in a passing reference to her; I guess it is rather like the press reaction to various terrorist acts in our own time, and indeed the dreadful disaster at Grenfell Tower in London. But I think it goes beyond that and that there was a genuine feeling amongst the population that Germany had 'played foul' from the first day of the war.

3 January 1940

The Times recorded awards made to members of Athenia's crew:

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Cutting from page 8 of The Times 3 January 1940 [43]


The Imperial War Museum has a portrait of Chief Officer M.B. Copeland by Thomas Cantrell Dugdale completed in 1940.

Copeland
Half-length portrait of Chief Officer M B Copeland in uniform, seated with his hands clasped. [47]

2 February 1940

The Aberdeen Press and Journal was one of several newspapers reporting that one of the lifeboats from Athenia had washed up on the Shetland Islands.

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Cutting from the Aberdeen Press and Journal 2 February 1940 [3]

10 February 1940

Presumably the same ocean current that brought the lost lifeboat to the Shetland Islands bore the two mailbags that turned up there as reported in the Aberdeen Press and Journal

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Cutting from the Aberdeen Press and Journal 10 February 1940 [3]

8 June 1940

There had continued to be references to Athenia since February but, for good reason, other events were in the forefront of people's minds as the war progressed. However the Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette reported that the Shipwrecked Fishermen and Mariners Society had expended £30,396 on relief efforts since the beginning of the war - though obviously not all related to Athenia.

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Cutting from the Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette 8 June 1940 [34]

29 October 1940

The Liverpool Evening Express reported that Captain James Cook of Athenia had been commended in the Merchant Navy Honours announcements.

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Cutting from the Liverpool Evening Express 29 October 1940 [21]

18 March 1941

In 1939, with the coming of WW2, Lloyd's set up a committee to find means of honouring seafarers who performed acts of exceptional courage at sea, and this resulted in the announcement on 27 December 1940 of the "Lloyd’s War Medal for Bravery at Sea". The bravery of Mr. Copeland was recognised by the award of one of the first of these medals as announced in the Evening Telegraph and Post.

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Cutting from the Evening Telegraph and Post 18 March 1941 [7]

1941 to 1945

There was really nothing new to say about the loss of Athenia but there are passing references to her loss throughout this period.


Click the link below for the truth of the sinking of Athenia that emerged during the Nuremberg Trials of major war criminals.

Next Page: Loss of Athenia - Background to the Nuremburg Trials