Liverpool Liners

Introduction

This page includes the postcards showing Liverpool liners in Geoff Topp's collection. Other than re-organisation, and the addition of notes, the content is the same as when published on the Merchantnavyofficers.com website.

Ascania

Ascania
Artwork postcards showing Ascania passing the Bar Lightship.

Ascania was a 13,900 GRT steam passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Cunard Steamship Company in 1925 by Armstrong, Whitworth & Co. at their High Walker yard. She was 158.5 metres long with beam 19.9 metres. Her steam turbine engines connected to twin screws could propel her at 15 knots. As built, she could carry 500 cabin class and 1,200 3rd class passengers and had a crew of 270. She was broken up in 1957.

Baltic

Baltic
Baltic at the Princes landing stage - believed to date from about 1908.
Baltic
Baltic at the Princes landing stage - believed to date from about 1904.

Baltic was a 23,876 GRT steam passenger ship completed for Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. in 1904 by Harland & Wolff at their Belfast yard. She was 216.2 metres long with beam 23 metres. Her two quadruple-expansion steam engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 17 knots. She was the largest ship in the world until 1905 and could carry 2,875 passengers. She was broken up in 1933.

Britannia

Britannia
Britannia approaching a lock at Liverpool Docks. The date is unknown.

Britannia is a name regularly used for ships but this one appears to be the 8,463 GRT passenger/cargo ship built for Anchor Line (Henderson Bros.) Ltd. by Alexander Stephen & Sons of Glasgow. She was 140.2 metres long with beam 18.0 metres. Her quadruple-expansion steam engine drove a single screw and she could achieve 15 knots. She was sunk on 25 March 1941 by gunfire from German raider Thor at position 08° 37' N 25° 28' W whilst en route from Liverpool to Bombay carrying passengers and a general cargo. Casualties are recorded on the Tower Hill memorial and details of those lost and an image of the commemorative panel can be found HERE.

Britannic

Britannic
Britannic pulling alongside Princes Landing Stage and believed to be from about 1935.
Britannic
Britannic pulling alongside Princes Landing Stage and believed to be from about 1935.
Britannic
Britannic behind an unidentified Canadian Pacific "Empress" liner at Princes Landing Stage. The date is unknown.

Brittanic was a 26,943 GRT motor passenger/cargo ship with refigeration completed for Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. in 1930 by Harland & Wolff at their Belfast yard. She was 208.4 metres long with beam 25.1 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 18 knots and carry 868 passengers. She was deployed as a troopship during WW2 and from 1949 she was owned by Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. She was broken up in 1960.

Carinthia (1925)

Carinthia
Carinthia (1925) leaving Liverpool. The date is unknown.

This Carinthia was a 20,227 steam turbine engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. in 1925 by Vickers Engineering Co. at their Barrow yard. She was 183.1 metres long with beam 22.5 metres. Her twin screws could propel her at 16.5 knots and could accommodate 1,650 passengers. She was actually laid down as Servia but renamed at her launching. She was used on the Liverpool to Boston route but also for cruising - including a world cruise in 1933. During WW2 she served as an armed merchant cruiser and was torpedoed and sunk on 6 June 1940 by German submarine U-46 with the loss of four lives.

Carinthia (1956)

Carinthia
Carinthia berthing at the Princes landing stage. The date is unknown.

This Carinthia was a 21,947 GRT steam-turbine powered passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. in 1956 by John Brown & Co. at their Clydebank yard. She was 185.4 metres long with beam 24.5 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 20 knots and carry 1,553 passengers. She was sold in 1968 and went through various changes of name and owner before finally being broken up at Alang in 2005.

Cedric

Cedric
Cedric at the Princes landing stage and is believed to date from about 1904.

Cedric was a 21,035 GRT quadruple-expansion steam-engined passenger/cargo ship completed for Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. in 1903 by Harland & Wolff Ltd. at their Belfast yard. She was 207.5 metres long with beam 23.0 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 16 knots and carry 1,223 passengers. She served as an armed merchant cruiser in WW1 and then used as a troopship, returned to normal service after the war and was broken up in 1932.

Duchess of Atholl

Duchess of Atholl
Duchess of Atholl at the Princes landing stage. The date is unknown.
Duchess of Atholl
Duchess of Atholl and appears to be a colour version of the previous image.

Duchess of Atholl was a 20,119 GRT steam turbine passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Canadian Pacific Railway Co. in 1928 by Wm. Beardmore & Co. at their Dalmuir yard. She was 177.4 metres long with beam 22.9 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 17.5 knots. She was sunk on 10 October 1942 by torpedoes fired by German submarine U-178 at position 07° 03' S 11° 12' W. Casualties are recorded on the Tower Hill memorial and details of those lost and an image of the commemorative panel can be found HERE.

Duchess of Richmond

Duchess of Richmond
Duchess of Richmond at the Princes landing stage. The date is unknown.

Duchess of Richmond was a 20,022 GRT steam turbine passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Canadian Pacific Railway Co. in 1928 by John Brown & Co. at their Clydebank yard. She was 177.4 metres long with beam 22.9 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 18 knots. She served in WW2 as a troopship and In 1947 was refitted as a luxury liner and renamed Empress of Canada. She caught fire on 25 January 1953 in Gladston Dock and heeled over. She was righted by parbuckling; a similar technique was used in 2014 to right the Costa Concordia. Beyond repair, she was taken be broken up at La Spezia in 1954.

Empire Test

Empire Test
Empire Test and a Canadian Pacific Railways liner at Princes landing stage. The date is unknown.

Empire Test was a 8,176 GRT quadruple-expansion steam-engined passenger/cargo ship built for Compagnie Belge Maritime du Congo as Thysville in 1922 by Societe Cockerill at their Hoboken yard in Belgium. She was 133.8 metres long with beam 17.4 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 14 knots. From 1947 she was owned by the British Government who renamed her Empire Test and put her into service as a troopship. She was broken up at Faslane in 1953.

Empress of Britain

Empress of Britain
Empress of Britain at an unknown location. The postcard is postmarked 7 September 1906.
Empress of Britain
Empress of Britain coming alongside the landing stage. The date is unknown.
Empress of Britain
Empress of Britain under tow near the landing stage. The date is unknown.

Empress of Britain was a 14,189 GRT quadruple-expansion steam-engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Canadian Pacific Railway Co. in 1906 by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd at their Govan yard. She was 167.3 metres long with beam 20.0 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 18 knots. She could carry 310 1st class, 470 2nd, and up to 730 steerage class passengers. She served as an armed merchantman in WW1 and from 1915 was deployed as a troopship conveying troops to the Dardenelles campaign and brought U.S. and Canadian forces across the Atlantic for the Expeditionary Force. She had several refits after the war including conversion to oil-fired boilers and modernisation of accommodation. She was renamed Montroyal in 1924 and was broken up at Stravanger in 1930.

Empress of England

Empress of England
Empress of England leaving the landing stage. The date is unknown.

Empress of England was a 25,585 GRT steam turbine passenger ship completed for Canadian Pacific Railway Co. in 1957 by Vickers-Armstrong at their High Walker yard. She was 195.1 metres long with beam 26.0 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 21 knots. She could carry 1,058 passengers. She was sold to Shaw, Savill & Albion Co. Ltd. in 1970 and renamed Ocean Monarch . She was broken up at Kaohsiung in 1975.

Empress of France

Empress of France
Empress of France at sea. The date is unknown.
Empress of France
Empress of France in the River Mersey. The date is unknown.

Empress of France was a 20,123 steam turbine engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Canadian Pacific Railway Co. Ltd. in 1928 by John Brown & Co. at their Clydebank yard as Duchess of Bedford. She was 177.4 metres long with beam 22.9 metres. Her twin screws could propel her at 17.5 knots. At the outbreak of WW2 in 1939 she was commandeered by the Admiralty and used to transport officials to India, and in 1941 assisted in the evacuation of Singapore. Later she supported the Allied invasion of Sicily in 1943. She was refitted in 1947 and renamed Empress of France - the previously intended name Empress of India being considered inappropriate withe imminent independence of India. She was taken out of service in 1960 and broken up at Newport.

Empress of Scotland

Unidentified
A Canadian Pacific Railways three-funnelled steamer Empress of Scotland at Princes Landing Stage. The date is unknown.

Empress of Scotland was a 26,032 GRT steam turbine passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Canadian Pacific Railway Co. in 1930 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd. as Empress of Japan at their Govan yard. She was 203.1 metres long with beam 25.4 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 21 knots and carried 1,260 passengers as a liner. She was requisitioned as a troopship in 1939 and was fitted with guns. In 1942 she was renamed Empress of Scotland, assisted with the evacuation of Singapore and brought many troops across the Atlantic during the build up to the Normandy Landings. After the war she was refitted and resumed duties with Canadian Pacific. In 1957 she was sold to Hamburg Atlantic Line who had her radically refitted including removal of one of her funnels and reconfiguration of accommodation, and was renamed Hanseatic. She caught fire in New York in 1966 and being beyond repair was broken up at Hamburg.

Franconia

Franconia
Artwork showing Franconia leaving Liverpool. The date is unknown. Note that the postcard is inscribed RMS Ivernia - see notes below.

Franconia was a 22,636 GRT steam turbine passenger ship completed for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. in 1955 by John Brown & Co. as Ivernia at their Clydebank yard. She was 185.4 metres long with beam 24.5 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 20 knots. She could carry 929 passengers. In 1963 she was rebuilt as a cruise ship and renamed Franconia. In 1973 she was sold to USSR (Far-Eastern Sg Co) and renamed Fedor Shalyapin, in 1991 to Odessa Cruise (Fedor Shalyapin) Co. Ltd. and in 2004 renamed Salona before being taken to Alang to be broken up.

Germanic

Germanic
Germanic leaving the Princes landing stage and is believed to date from about 1904.

Germanic has a fascinating history. She was a 5,008 GRT compound-engined/sailing passenger ship completed for Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. (White Star Line) in 1875 by Harland & Wolff at their Belfast yard. She was 138.7 metres long with beam 13.8 metres, had a single screw and could accommodate 220 1st class and 500 3rd class passengers. As built she had four masts of which three were square-rigged. She won the Blue Riband for the fastest Atlantic crossing in 1875 with a time of 7 days, 11 hours and 17 minutes and beat her own record the following year. In 1895 she had a major refit including replacing the compound engine with a triple expansion steam engine and removing the square-rigged sails. In 1904 she was transferred to British & North Atlantic Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. and renamed Ottawa and it 1911 sold to the Turkish government and renamed Gul Djemal and served with on the Turkish side in WW1 until sunk by a torpedo during the Gallipoli campaign. She was raised and repaired and used as a troopship by the British. After the war she was returned to the Turks and in 1928 was renamed Gulcemal. By 1949 she was used for storage and in 1950 was converted into a floating hotel. She was finally broken up in 1950 at Messina giving her a service life of 75 years.

Letitia

Letitia
Letitia in the River Mersey. The date is unknown.

Letitia was a 13,475 steam turbine engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Anchor-Donaldson Ltd in 1925 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at their Govan yard. She was 160.2 metres long with beam 20.2 metres. Her twin screws could propel her at 15.5 knots and she could accommodate 516 cabin class and 1,000 third class passengers as built and was used for transatlantic crossings. In 1939 she was requisitioned by the Admiralty and converted to an armed merchant cruiser with 6 inch and 3 inch guns and used initially as a convoy escort and from 1941 as a troopship. In 1943 she was badly damaged but repaired and used as a hospital ship by the Canadian government. In 1946 she was sold to the UK Ministry of War Transport and was renamed Empire Brent. After a collision with Stormont in the Mersey, in which Stormont was sunk, she had a complete overhaul and was fitted out again as a troopship, later serving to carry emigrants to Australia. Laid up briefly she was renamed Captain Cook and took emigrants to New Zealand. After further sterling service, she was broken up at Inverkeithing in 1960.

Lucania

Lucania
Lucania at the landing stage - believed to date from about 1907.

Lucania was a 12,952 GRT triple-expansion steam engined passenger ship completed for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. in 1893 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. at their Govan yard. She was 183.2 metres long with beam 19.9 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 21 knots. She could carry 600 first, 400 second and 1000 third class passengers. She was the first Cunard ship to be fitted with a Marconi wireless system in 1901 and worked closely with the inventor as he experimented with transatlantic transmissions. She was superseded by larger and faster ships and ceased operation in 1909. Laid up in Huskisson Dock, she was badly damaged by a fire and was sold for scrap. She was broken up at Swansea.

Lusitania

Lusitania
Lusitania approaches the landing stage for the first time in 1907.
Lusitania
Lusitania leaving the Liverpool docks and is believed to date from 1907.
Lusitania
Lusitania at the landing stage looking from the North. The date is unknown.
Lusitania
Lusitania making a lot of smoke at an unknown location. The date is unknown.
Lusitania
Lusitania passing Cemaes Bay in Anglesey. The date is unknown.
Lusitania
Lusitania at the landing stage at Princes Dock. The date is unknown.

Lusitania was a 31,550 GRT steam-turbine engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. in 1907 by John Brown & Co. at their Clydebank yard. She was 232.3 metres long with beam 26.8 metres. Her engines drove four screws and she could achieve 25 knots. She could carry 552 first, 460 second and 1,186 third class passengers. She was torpedoed and sunk on 7 May 1915 by German submarine U-20 with the loss of 1,198 passengers and crew in an incident that caused a storm of protest in the U.S. as 128 Americans perished. There is an account of the sinking and details of the merchant navy casualties HERE.

Majestic

Majestic
Majestic at an unknown location and is believed to date from about 1904.

Majestic was a 56,551 GRT steam-turbine engined passenger ship completed for Hamburg American Line in 1922 by Blohn & Voss at their Steinwerder yard as Bismarck. She was 279 metres long with beam 30.5 metres. Her engines drove four screws and she could achieve 23.5 knots. She could carry 750 first, 545 second and 850 third class passengers and was the largest ship in the world until the completion of Normandie in 1935. At the end of WW1 she was handed over to the UK as part of war reparations and passed to Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. (White Star Line) and renamed Majestic. In 1936 an attempt was made to sell her for scrap but the deal failed because of the 'small print' in the reparation arrangements. Instead the Royal Navy provided the scrapyard with an equivalent weight of scrap in the form of outmoded destroyers and converted Majestic into a training ship with a change of name to HMS Caledonia. At the outbreak of WW2 she was moved to the Firth of Forth pending a decision on disposal but caught fire and sank at her moorings. In 1943 the wreck was raised and taken qo Inverkeithing to be broken up.

Medic

Medic
Artwork showing Medic in the River Mersey.

Medic was a 5,091 GRT triple-expansion steam engined passenger/cargo ship completed for Ismay Imrie & Co. (White Star Line) in 1899 by Harland & Wolff at their Belfast yard. She was 167.7 metres long with beam 19.3 metres and her twin screws was capable of 14 knots. She could accommodate 320 steerage class passengers. She served as an Australian troopship in the Boer War and in WW1. She returned to normal duties but in 1928 was sold to N.Bugge of Norway and converted into a whale factory ship. She was torpedoed and sunk on 11 September 1942 by German submarine U-608.

Melita

Melita
Melita leaving Gladstone Dock. The date is unknown.

Melita was a 13,967 GRT triple-expansion steam-engined (with additional exhaust turbine) passenger ship completed for Canadian Pacific Railway Ocean Lines in 1918 by Barclay, Curle & Co. at their Whiteinch yard. She was 158.5 metres long with beam 20.5 metres. Her engines drove triple screws and she could achieve 16.5 knots knots. She was sold to "Italia" (Flotte Riunite Cosulich-Lloyd Sabaudo-Nav Gen) in 1935 and renamed Liguria. Sold again to Lloyd Triestino SA di Nav in 1937, she was used as a troopship by Italy during WW2. She became a casualty of war when bombed and scuttled at Tobruk Roads, Libya in 1941. The hull was raised and broken up at Savona in 1950.

Montnairn

Montnairn
Montnairn at Princes Dock landing stage. The date is unknown.

Montnairn was a 17,082 GRT Quadruple-expansion steam-engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Norddeutscher Lloyd in 1908 by Tecklenborg at their Geestemunde, Germany yard. When her keel was laid down she was due to be named Washington but this was changed to Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm before she was launched. She was 179.8 metres long with beam 20.8 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 17 knots. She could accommodate 46 1st, 338 2nd and up to 1,726 steerage passengers. At the outbreak of WW1 she took shelter in Norway and remained there to the end of the war. She then served the US Navy for a short period as a troopship and then transferred to the U.S. Shipping Board in 1919. In 1921 she was bought by Canadian Pacific Railways, refitted in Glasgow and her name changed to Empress of China. Before sailing under that name, it was changed again to Empress of India and she was chartered by Cunard but was returned to CPR after two round trips. She was then reconfigured and renamed Montlaurier, renamed again in 1925 to Montieth but never sailed under that name and renamed Montnairn, also in 1925. She continued in service until 1929 when she was scrapped at Genoa.

Oceanic

Oceanic
Oceanic at an unknown location and is believed to date from about 1904.

Oceanic was a 17,274 GRT triple-expansion steam-engined passenger ship completed for Ismay Imrie & Co. (White Star Line) in 1899 by Harland & Wolff at their Belfast yard. She was 209 metres long with beam 20.8 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 19 knots. She could accomodate 410 First, 300 Second and 1,000 Third Class passengers and was the largest ship in the world until 1901. At the outbreak of WW1 she was commissioned into the Royal Navy as HMS Oceanic and fitted out as an armed merchant cruiser. This service was to last only two weeks as she wrecked on the Shaalds of Foula on 7 September 1914 - apparently as a result of a navigation error. The wreck was progressively removed over a period of 65 years. The first part apparently by one of my heroes Ernest Cox, who salvaged the scuttled German fleet in Scapa Flow (though I can find no references to confirm this), and the remainder in 1973 and 1979.

Parisian

Parisian
The Allan Line passenger shipParisian anchored in the River Mersey and is believed to date from about 1910.

Parisian was a 5,395 GRT compund-engined steam passenger ship completed in 1881 by Robert Napier & Sons of Govan East for J.& A. Allan. She served the route from the UK to Canada calling at Quebec and Montreal. in 1899 her engine was replaced with a triple-expansion engine, the sailing rigging removed and reduced to one funnel. She made her final Atlantic crossing in 1913 and was broken up at Genoa in 1914. The image must therefore be from before 1899 rather than 1910.

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh
Artwork showing Pittsburgh at sea. The date is unknown. Note the advert for marmalade.

Pittsburgh was a 16,313 GRT triple-expansion steam engined passenger ship completed for International Navigation Co. Ltd. in 1918 by Harland & Wolff at their Belfast yard. She was 175.4 metres long with beam 20.7 metres and her triple screws was capable of 16 knots. She could accommodate 600 cabin class and 1,800 third class passengers and served the transatlantic route. In 1922 she was renamed Pennland and in 1928 sold to Frederick Leyland & Co. Ltd. In 1934 she was sold to Red Star Linie GmbH and in 1939 to Nederlandsche-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Mij. She was attacked by aircraft on 25 April 1941 whilst en route from Alexandria to Megara and subsequently scuttled by gunfire.

Queen Elizabeth 2

Queen Elizabeth II
Queen Elizabeth 2 anchored in the Mersey and is believed to date from 1990.

Queen Elizabeth 2 is a 65,863 GRT steam turbine engined passenger/cruise ship completed for Cunard Line Ltd. in 1969 by Upper Clyde Shipbuilding Ltd. at their Clydebank yard. She was 293.5 metres long with beam 32.1 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 28.5 knots. She could accomodate 1,892 passengers. She served briefly as a troopship during the Falklands War then reverted to normal use. Her speed increased to 34 knots after her engines were replaced by diesel electric propulsion during a refit in 1986/7 which also increased her to 70,327 GRT. In 2004 she stopped transatlantic crossings and used for cruises but was falling behind the facilities offered by more modern ships. In 2007 she was sold to a Dubai company called Istithmar and since then there have been a lot of proposals as to her future use. As of 2014 she remains laid up.

Queen Mary

Queen Mary
Artwork showing the Cunard liner Queen Mary. Geoff Topp thanked 'Threebs' for this image.

Queen Mary is a 81,235 GRT steam turbine engined passenger ship completed for Cunard Line Ltd. in 1936 by John Brown & Co. at their Clydebank yard. She was 310.8 metres long with beam 36.2 metres. Her engines drove four screws and she could achieve 30 knots. She could accomodate 776 first (cabin) class, 784 tourist class, and 579 third class passengers. At the outbreak of WW2 she was converted to a troopship and served in that capacity throughout the war then reverted to normal use after a refit. Transatlantic passages became increasingly unpopular with the advent of jet flights and she was finally taken out of service in 1967. She was sold and sailed under her own steam to Long Beach, California where she has become a tourist attraction and hotel.

Queen of Bermuda

Queen of Bermuda
Furness Withy liner Queen of Bermuda anchored in the Mersey. The date is unknown.

Queen of Bermuda was a 22,575 GRT steam-turbine engined with electric drive passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Furness, Withy & Co Ltd. in 1933 by Vickers-Armstrong at their Barrow yard. She was 168.7 metres long with beam 23.3 metres. Her engines drove four screws and she could achieve 21 knots. During WW2 she served as an armoured merchant cruiser and later a troopship. After the war she reverted to Furness Withy and cruises to Bermuda. She was modernised in 1961 and rebuilt with a single funnel. She was retired from service and broken up at Faslane in 1966.

Reina Del Mar

Reina Del Mar
Pacific Steam Navigation Company liner Reina Del Mar. The location and date are unknown.

Reina Del Mar was a 20,234 GRT steam-turbine engined passenger/cargo ship completed for Pacific Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. in 1956 by Harland & Wolff at their Belfast yard. She was 183.1 metres long with beam 23.9 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she could achieve 18 knots. She could accommodate 207 first, 216 cabin and 343 tourist class passengers and was deployed on the South American route until 1964. She was then converted to a two-class cruise ship capable of accommodating 1,047 passengers. From 1969 she was owned by Royal Mail Lines Ltd. and from 1973 by Union-Castle Mail Steamship Co. Ltd. and finally withdrawn from service in 1975 and broken up at Kaohsiung .

Reina Del Pacifico

Reina Del Pacifico
Pacific Steam Navigation Company liner Reina Del Pacifico. The location and date are unknown.
Reina Del Pacifico
Pacific Steam Navigation Company liner Reina Del Pacifico. The location and date are unknown.

Reina Del Pacifico was a 17,702 GRT diesel engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Pacific Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. in 1930 by Harland & Wolff at their Belfast yard. She was 168 metres long with beam 23.3 metres. Her engines drove four screws and she could achieve 19 knots. She was mainly used on routes from Liverpool to the Caribbean, Panama Canal and South America. She was deployed as a troopship during WW2 and conveyed troops to North Africa, Sicily and Normandy. She was returned to PSNC in 1947 and resumed services in 1948 after refurbishment. She was finally withdrawn from service in 1958 and broken up at Newport, Monmouthshire.

Royal Viking Queen

Royal Viking Queen
Royal Viking Queen. Geoff Topp thanked 'Threebs' for this image.

Royal Viking Queen is a 9,961 GRT motor passenger (cruise) ship completed in 1992 by Schichau Seebeck of Bremerhaven for L. Kloster and registered in the Bahamas. She is 135 metres long with beam 20.5 metres. Her engines drive twin screws and is capable of 16 knots. In 1995 she was renamed Queen Odyssey and in 1996 Seabourn Legend and as of 2014 she is still in service.

Samaria

Samaria
Samaria on the front of an invitation to visit the ship Huskisson Dock in September 1927.
Samaria
An invitation to visit Samaria or Andania in Huskisson Dock in September 1927.

Samaria was a 19,602 GRT steam turbined engined passenger/cargo ship completed in 1920 by Cammell, Laird & Co. for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. She was 183.2 metres long with beam 22.5 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and were capable of 16.5 knots. She was used extensively for cruising in the 1920s and was also used by Cunard as a "backup" ship, taking over when other liners were under repair. She served as a troopship during WW2 and was returned to Cunard in 1950. After a full overhaul she returned to service in 1951 and operated on the Canada route. She was laid up in 1955 and taken to Inverkeithing to be broken up in 1956.

Saxonia (1900)

Saxonia
Saxonia at Princes landing stage and is believed to date from about 1903.

This Saxonia was a 13,963 GRT quadruple-expansion steam engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. in 1900 by John Brown & Co. at their Clydebank yard. She was 176.8 metres long with beam 19.6 metres and her twin screws were capable of 16 knots. As built, she could accommodate 1,964 passengers and was used on both transatlantic and Mediterranean routes. During WW1 she served briefly as a troopship then was stationed in the River Thames to serve as accommodation for German POWs, then resumed service as a troopship in 1915. Whe was refitted in 1920 and reconfigured to take 471 cabin class and 978 third class passengers. In 1925 she broken up by Hendrik Ido Ambacht in the Netherlands.

Saxonia (1954)

Saxonia
Artwork showing Saxonia leaving Liverpool. The date is unknown.

This Saxonia was a 22,592 GRT steam turbined engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed in 1954 by John Brown & Co. for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. She was 185.4 metres long with beam 24.5 metres and could carry 881 passengers. Her engines drove twin screws and were capable of 20 knots. In 1962 she had a major refit and her name changed to Carmania. She was laid up in 1971 and purchased by Black Sea Shipping Company and renamed Leonid Sobinov. She was laid up again in 1995 and in 1999 taken to be broken up at Alang.

Scythia

Scythia
Artwork showing Scythia off Pier Head. The date is unknown.

Scythia was a 19,730 GRT steam turbined engined passenger/cargo ship completed in 1920 by Vickers for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. She was 183.1 metres long with beam 22.5 metres and could carry 350 1st, 350 2nd and 1,500 3rd class passengers. Her engines drove twin screws and were capable of 16.5 knots. In 1962 she had a major refit and her name changed to Carmania. She was used as a troopship in WW2 and carried evacuees from Liverpool to New York. Whilst engaged in landings in North Africa in 1942 she was damaged by a torpedo fired from an aeroplane but was salvaged and repaired. The casualties are commemorated on the Merchant Navy memorial at Tower Hill and other cemeteries - further information about them can be found HERE. At the end of the war she took many American troops back home and also many "war brides" - British women who had married US and Canadian servicemen. In 1948 she was employed by the International Refugee Organisation to take refugees from Europe to Canada and was returned to her normal duties in 1950. More refugees from Hungary were transported to Canada in 1957 after the uprising. In 1958 she was taken to be broken up at Inverkeithing.

Splendour of the Seas

Splendour of the Seas
Splendour of the Seas anchored in the River Mersey and is believed to date from the 1990s.

Splendour of the Seas is a 69,130 GRT motor passenger (cruise) ship completed in 1996 by Atlantique (Alsthom) of St. Nazaire for GIE Cruise Vision Two and originally registered in Oslo. She has an overall length of 264.3 metres and a beam of 36.3 metres and can accommodate 2,076 passengers. Her diesel engines with electric propulsion and twin screws can propel her at a speed of 24 knots. From 2007 she has been owned by Splendour of the Seas Inc and is registered in the Bahamas. As of 2014 she is still operational and running cruises for Royal Caribbean.

Sylvania

Sylvania
Sylvania at the Princes landing stage. The date is unknown.

Sylvania was a 21,989 GRT steam-turbine engined passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed in 1957 by John Brown & Co. for Cunard Steamship Co. She had an overall length of 185.4 metres and a beam of 24.5 metres and could accommodate 925 passengers. Her engines drove twin screws and she was capable of a speed of 20 knots. In 1967 Cunard was making heavy losses and put Sylvania and Carinthia up for sale. In 1968 she was sold to Sitmar Line who re-registered her in Liberia and changed her name to Fairwind and used her for cruises. After a change of livery and naming policy the company changed her name to Sitmar Fairwind in 1988 but this was short-lived and she was sold to P & O who renamed her Dawn Princess and transferred her to the Princess Cruises division. In 1993 she was sold to V-Ships and renamed Albatros. In 2002 the ship had severe machinery problems and it was decided that it would be uneconomical to repair her so she was sent to be be broken up at Alang. She had a final name change to Genoa for this voyage and she was beached to be broken up in 2004.

Teutonic

Teutonic
Teutonic anchored in the River Mersey and is believed to date from about 1904.

Teutonic was a 9.984 GRT triple-expansion steam-engined passenger ship completed in 1889 by Harland & Wolff for Ismay Imrie & Co. (White Star Line). She had an overall length of 172.4 metres and a beam of 17.6 metres and could accommodate 300 first class, 190 second class and 1,000 third class passengers and was the first White Star ship not to be fitted with square-rigged sails. Her engines drove twin screws and she was capable of a speed of 20 knots and was used for transatlantic crossings. She served as a troopship during the Boer War and during WW1 she served as an armed merchant cruiser after being fitted with 6" guns and was deployed as a convoy escort as well as troop transport. She was broken up at Emden in 1921.

Themistocles

Themistocles
White Star liner Themistocles anchored in the River Mersey. The date is unknown.

Themistocles was a 11,231 GRT quadrulple-expansion steam-engined passenger ship completed in 1911 by Harland & Wolff for G.Thompson & Co Ltd (Aberdeen Line). She had an overall length of 157.6 metres and a beam of 19 metres. Her engines drove twin screws and she was capable of a speed of 15 knots and was used for London to Australia routes so it is not clear what she was doing in the Mersey - if that is where the photo was taken. She could accommodate 100 first and 300 third class passengers - the latter in various types of cabin housing between one and eight people. She served as a troopship during WW1 and survived to take part in convoys in WW2. She was taken to be broken up at Dalmuir in 1947.

Victorian

Victorian
Victorian in the River Mersey. The date is unknown.

Victorian was a 10,629 GRT steam turbine passenger/cargo ship with refrigeration completed in 1905 by Workman Clark at their Belfast yard for Allan Line Steamship Co. Ltd. She had an overall length of 158.5 metres and a beam of 18.4 metres. Her engines drove three screws and she was capable of a speed of 18 knots. She could accommodate 470 first, 240 second and 9400 third class passengers. She was used for transatlantic crossings and could handle 8,000 tons of cargo and carry fruit and dairy products from Canada in her refrigerated space. She served as an auxiliary cruiser in WW1 acting as both an escort and troopship. She returned to civilian service in 1920 as part of Canadian Pacific which had taken over Allan Line. She was converted to a single-class vessel and renamed Marloch in 1922 and was broken up at Milford Haven in 1929.

Unidentified

If anyone is able to make a definite identification of any of the ships below, please contact the website owner with details via the email address at the foot of this page.

Unidentified
Unidentified liner in the River Mersey and is believed to date from about 1905.
Unidentified
Artwork showing an unidentified Allan Line liner passing New Brighton. The date is unknown.
Unidentified
Unknown Cunard Line steamer at Princes Landing Stage. The date is unknown.
Unidentified
Unknown Cunard Line steamer and other vessels at Princes Landing Stage. The date is unknown.
Unidentified
Unknown Empire liner at Princes Landing Stage. The date is unknown.
Unidentified
Unknown Cunard Line four-funneller alongside the landing stage. The date is unknown.
Unidentified
Unknown Cunard Line four-funneller leaving the landing stage and is believed to date from about 1922.
Unidentified
Unknown Elder Dempster Line passenger ship at Princes landing stage. The date is unknown.
Unidentified
Unknown Canadian Pacific Railways 'Empress' steamer at Princes Landing Stage. The date is unknown.