Liverpool North Docks System

Introduction

This page is arranged in order of docks from North to South. Not all docks in the system are represented in the collection.

I have been unable to locate a map showing the layout of the entire dock system, but the map below shows most of it, and I have included a diagram constructed to show the connections between the various docks, the River Mersey and the Leeds, Liverpool Canal

Canada to Prince's Half-tide Docks
Extract from the Royal Atlas of England and Wales (1898) showing the dock system from Canada Dock to Prince's half-tide dock.
Liverpool North Docks
Diagram showing the inter-connections of the Liverpool North Docks system.

Gladstone Dock

Gladstone Dock is very large and was designed to take the largest transatlantic steamers. It was named for Robert Gladstone, second cousin of Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone. The construction was a long process and was completed in 1927 by which time is consisted of three miles of quays. It was served by its own railway station and continued to service transatlantic traffic until 1971 when all such services ceased. It is still in use and forms part of Liverpool Freeport. Gladstone Dock is connected to Seaforth Dock in the north and Hornby Dock in the south.

Gladstone Dock
Gladstone new Dock - aerial shot prior to the Royal opening in July 1927.
Gladstone Dock
Several steam vessels in Gladstone Dock. The date is not known.
Gladstone Dock
Several steam vessels in Gladstone Dock. The date is not known.
Gladstone Dock
An aerial view of liners in Gladstone Dock. The date is not known.
Gladstone Dock
An aerial view of Alexandra Dock to Gladstone Dock and is believed to date from around 1963.
Gladstone Dock
Aquitania entering Seaforth Gladstone Dry Dock. The date is not known.
Gladstone Dock
Montclare in Gladstone Branch Dock No.1. The date is not known.
Gladstone Dock
A dredger in the Gladstone Dry Dock. The date is not known.
Gladstone Dock
Artwork showing "The new Gladstone Docks Liverpool showing Cunard liners - that in the foreground is Aquitania

Hornby Dock

Hornby Dock was connected to Gladstone Dock to the North and Alexandra Dock to the South; it was opened in 1884 and was used by the timber trade. Hornby dock has subsequently been filled in.

Hornby Alexandra Dock
A view of Alexandra Dock - the date is not known.

Alexandra Dock

Alexandra Dock is connected to Hornby Dock to the North and Langton Dock to the South. It was opened in 1881 and consists of a main basin and three branch docks. It supported the grain trade and provided refrigeration facilities for imported frozen meat. Although still in existence, one arm of its docks has been filled in. Its main export is now scrap metal.

Alexandra Dock
An aerial view of Hornby and Alexandra docks and is believed to date from about 1920.
Alexandra Dock
An aerial view of Alexandra dock and grain silo. Date not known.

Langton Dock

Langton Dock is connected to Alexandra Dock to the North and Brocklebank Dock to the South. It was opened in 1881 and consisted of a main basin with a branch dock and two graving docks. The branch and graving docks have been filled in to provide car parking. The main dock was used occasionally as a terminal for cruise liners but this use stopped in 2013 when the Liverpool Cruise Liner Terminal opened in 2013 and Langton Dock is currently disused (2014).

Langton Dock
A view of Langton Dock showing a mixture of tugs, steamers and sailing vessels and is believed to date from about 1905.
Langton Dock
A view of the dry docks within Langton Dock. The date is unknown but there are several sailing vessels in the background.
Langton Dock
Two vessels within the graving dock which was part of the Langton Dock complex. The date is unknown.

Canada Basin

Canada Basin is provides an exit to the Mersey and is connected to Langton Dock to the North and Canada Dock to the South. It was completed in 1859.

Canada Basin
Artwork showing Canada Basin looking north over Langton and Alexandra Docks.
Canada Basin
Aerial view showing the Canada Basin and Langton and Canada Docks.

Brocklebank Dock

Brocklebank Dock is connected to Langton Dock to the North, Canada Dock to the South and Carriers' Dock to the East. It was opened in 1862 and was originally known as Canada Half-Tide Dock. It was renamed in 1879 in honour of Ralph Brocklebank. Initially the dock handled mainly timber but later in its life was the terminal for passengers and freight travelling to and from Belfast.

Brocklebank Dock
Sailing ships in Brocklebank Dock. The date is believed to be around 1902.

Carriers' Dock

Otherwise known as North Carriers' Dock, it was opened as one of a pair of docks in 1862. It's partner South Carriers' Dock was used as a graving dock from 1898. It is conected to Brocklebank Dock to the West.

Carriers' Dock
An ariel view showing Canada Dock and Carriers' Dock. Date not known.

Canada Dock

Canada Dock consists of a main basin with three branch docks and a graving dock. It is connected to Brocklebank Dock to the North and Huskisson Dock to the South. It was designed by Jesse Hartley and opened in 1859 and dealt largely with timber from Canada - hence the name. The dock was modified in the 1950s and 1960s so it could become a base for cargo line companises such as Harrison Line. The dock is still in use handling bulk cargoes and scrap metal.

Canada Dock
A variety of vessels in Canada Dock. The date is not known.
Canada and Huskisson Docks
An aerial view of Canada and Huskisson Docks. The date is not known.
Canada Dock Entrance
An aerial view of the entrance to Canada Dock. The date is not known.
Canada Dock
View of Canada Dock. The date is not known but probably early 20th Century.
Canada Dock
A ship and barges in Canada Dock. The date is not known.

Huskisson Dock

Huskisson dock consists of a main basin and two branch docks. It is connected to Canada Dock to the North and Sandon Half-Tide Dock to the South. It was designed by Jesse Hartley and opened in 1852 and got its name from William Huskisson - a former MP and Treasurer of the Navy. Initially the dock primarily handled timber but later in grain and as a berth for passenger ships on the North American routes. Branch Dock No. 2 was severely damaged by an explosion of an ammunition ship Malakand was hit during an air raid and was put out of use until it could be rebuilt after the war. It was later filled in and is in use as a timber yard. The remainder of the dock is still in use handling bulk cargoes.

Huskisson Dock
A view of Huskisson Dock and Caronia. The date is not known. There were several ships of this name but I believe this to be the one completed for Cunard Steamship Co. Ltd. by John Brown & Co. in 1905. If so she was broken up in Osaka in 1933.
Huskisson Dock
A view of Huskisson Dock from about 1905.

Sandon Dock and Sandon Half-Tide Dock

Opened in 1851, what became the Sandon Half-Tide Dock was originally part of both Sandon Dock and Wellington Half-Tide Dock, which connected directly to the Mersey via a narrow lock entrance. At the turn of the 20th century, Sandon Dock was redeveloped and an enlarged half-tide dock created, with two larger locks built either side of the original entrance. Various other docks could be accessed via lock gates. Sandon Dock was later filled in and the site developed for sewage treatment.

Sandon Dock
Harmodius coming into dock and at the entrance of Sandon Dock. The date is not known.
Sandon Half Tide Dock Entrance
An aerial view showing the entrance to the Sandon half-tide dock. The date is not known.
Sandon Dock Entance.jpg
Another aerial view showing the entrance to the Sandon half-tide dock. The date is not known.
Sandon Half Tide Dock
A view inside the Sandon half-tide dock. The date is not known.
Sandon Half Tide Dock
A view inside the Sandon half-tide dock and believed to date from around 1920.
Sandon Half Tide Dock
Aerial view of the Sandon half-tide dock entrance and believed to date from around 1925.

Salisbury Dock

Salisbury Dock is connected to Nelson Dock to the north, Trafalgar Dock to the south and also to Collingwood Dock. Like the other docks in this part of the system, it was designed by Jesse Hartley and opened in 1948. It served as a half-tide dock being connected to the River Mersey via two locked entrances and also provided access to the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. The dock was the principal hub for coastal and barge traffic in Liverpool by the mid-twentieth century. The dock is also subject to redevelopment as part of the Liverpool Waters project.

Salisbury Dock
An aerial view of Salisbury Dock and shows Victoria Tower and river entrances. The date is unknown.
Salisbury Dock
The entrance to Salisbury Dock. The date is unknown.

Stanley Dock

Stanley Dock was designed by Jesse Hartley according to most online sources and was opened in 1848. However the design is also claimed for his son, John Bernard Hartley.

Stanley Dock is connected to Salisbury Dock to the East and a series of locks connect it to the Leeds and Liverpool canal system. A bascule bridge spans the water passage between Collingwood and Stanley Docks. The dock is the focal point of the Stanley Dock Conservation Area and there are plans to convert the old warehouses into office spaces and apartments. The centre of the old tobacco warehouse is being dug out to created a courtyard garden.

Stanley Dock Tobacco Warehouse, is a grade II listed building and is the world's largest brick warehouse. Standing 125 Ft. high, the building was at the time of its construction in 1901, claimed to be the world's largest building in terms of area. The 14 storey building spans across 36 acres and its construction used 27 million bricks, 30,000 panes of glass and 8,000 tons of steel. The overall design is by A.G. Lyster, the Dock Engineer, but Arthur Berrington almost certainly played a part. The warehouse was a late addition to the Stanley Dock complex and was built on land reclaimed from the dock.

Stanley Dock
The Stanley Dock Tobacco Warehouse. The date is unknown.

Waterloo Dock

Waterloo Dock was opened in 1834 and named after the famous battle. In 1868 is was split into separate basins - East Waterloo Dock and West Waterlood Dock. The dock is connected to Victoria Dock in the North and Princes Half-Tide Dock to the South. The dock was closed to shipping in 1988 and the extensive Waterloo Warehouse converted into residential apartments.

Waterloo Dock
A view of Waterloo Dock and believed to date from about 1912.

Princes Half-Tide Dock

Princes Half-Tide Dock is connected to the East Waterloo Dock and West Waterloo Dock to the north and Princes Dock to the south. It opened in 1810 and provided a lock entrance to the Mersey. The passage is now closed off and the area is being redeveloped. A 60-storey building to be called Shanghai Tower will be built on this site.

Princes Half-Tide Dock
Sailing vessels in the Princes Half-Tide Dock and is believed to date from around 1900.
Princes Half-Tide Dock
Princes Half-Tide Dock at high tide with a vessel entering the Mersey and is believed to date from around 1903.
Princes Half-Tide Dock
Entrance to Princes Half-Tide Dock. The date is unknown.

Prince's Dock

Prince's Dock was named after the Prince Regent and opened on the day of his coronation as George IV in 1821; it was accessed via George's Dock. It became disused after 1981 and is now within a large development area of apartments and hotels with large parts of the dock being filled in. The dock is now connected to an extension of the Leeds and Liverpool canal and there is access to the Mersey via a tunnel leading to the Pier Head area.

Princes and Albert Docks
An aerial view of the Princes and Albert Docks showing the landing stages. The date is unknown.
Princes Dock
The landing stage and dry dock at Princes Dock. The date is unknown. This image is particularly fascinating due to the ship in the background with four funnels. As the date of the image is not known, it is impossible to know for sure which vessel this is but there have only been 15 ships with four funnels by all accounts. Ruling out the most unlikely, the remaining contenders are: Lusitania (completed 1907, sunk 1915); Mauretania (completed 1907, scrapped 1935); Olympic (completed 1911, scrapped 1937); Titanic (completed and sunk 1912); Aquitania (completed 1914, scrapped 1950); Britannic (completed 1914, sunk 1916); Arundel Castle (completed 1921, scrapped 1959); and Windsor Castle (completed 1922, sunk 1943). Having discussed this with fellow shipping enthusiasts, the best guess is that she is Aquitania.
Princes Dock
An aerial view of Princes Dock and the North landing stages. The date is unknown.
Princes Dock
An aerial view of Princes Dock and the West landing stages. The date is unknown.
Princes Dock
A view of Princes Dock and is believed to date from about 1965.
Princes Dock
An aerial view of Princes Dock Landing Stage looking South and is believed to date from about 1955.
Princes Dock
A view of Princes Dock looking North towards New Brighton and is believed to date from about 1938.
Princes Dock
Prince's Dock and Prince's dry dock. The date is unknown.