Other Mersey Docks

Introduction

This page is arranged in alphabetical order of the docks rather than geographical location.

Dingle

Dingle lies upstream of the Liverpool docks - just past the site of the Herculaneum Dock. Dingle had no docks but became a site for unloading oil from its jetties. The jetties are long gone and it is difficult to see exactly where they were on a modern map as there has been a lot of land reclamation. The site of the oil storage depots is now largely taken up by housing.

Dingle Oil Jetties
An aerial view of the North and South Oil Jetties and storage facilities at Dingle. The date is unknown.

Garston North Dock

The port of Garston lies upstream of the Liverpool docks and close to the site of Liverpool Airport and originally served the salt trade. Later the docks were very busy handling coal. The complex consists of three docks - Old Dock, North Dock and Stalbridge Dock.

The North Dock at Garston was completed in 1867 due to an increase in trade in the port.

Garston North Dock
View of Garston North Dock and is believed to date from around 1924.
Garston North Dock
This is a black and white version of the previous card

Garston Old Dock

The Garston Old Dock was the first to be built around 1850.

Garston Old Dock
View of Garston Old Dock - believed to date from around 1920.

Garston Stalbridge Dock

The Stalbridge Dock was opened in 1909 and is still in use to some extent.

Stalbridge Dock
A view of Stalbridge Dock - believed to date from about 1920.
Stalbridge Dock
An aerial view of Stalbridge Dock and coal tips at Garston. The date is unknown.
Stalbridge Dock
Stalbridge Dock and locks - believed to date from about 1925.
Stalbridge Dock
Stalbridge Dock Garston - date not known.
Stalbridge Dock
Garston Stalbridge Dock - believed to date from about 1902.

Manchester Ship Canal

The Manchester Ship Canal was built to take vessels into new docks built in Manchester. It opened in 1894, is 36 miles long and includes 5 locks lifting vessels about 60 feet above sea level. The entrance is on the River Mersey at Eastham and the termination is at Salford Quays. Usage had dropped steadily over time but there are plans to increase it again.

Eastham Locks
An aerial view of the entrance to the canal at Eastham Locks and is believed to date from about 1955.
Eastham Locks
An inbound steam vessel at Eastham Locks. The date is not known.
Eastham Locks
South bound steam vessel at Eastham Locks. The date is not known.

Port Sunlight

Port Sunlight is a model village built by Lever Brothers to house workers working at their new soap-making business. Located in what was at the time a marshy area adjacent to the River Mersey on The Wirral, it had its own private facilities at Bromborough Pool for landing the raw materials used in manufacture arriving at the Liverpool docks using the companies own barges and coasters. Materials were also transported to and from the company factories at Warrington. The facilities fell into disuse from the 1980s and the site was used for landfill. The site was redeveloped at a cost of £2.3M by the Land Trust and was opened to the public on 12 August 2014 as The Port Sunlight River Park. It includes wildflower meadows, grasslands, views of the Liverpool skyline and facilities for families and dog-walking.

Port Sunlight
Bromborough Pool at Port Sunlight with the Lever Bros. factory in the background. The date is unknown.
Port Sunlight
Bromborough Pool at Port Sunlight taken from "The Tower" according to the caption. It is believed to date from around 1910.
Port Sunlight
The Port Sunlight lock at Bromborough Pool. The date is unknown.