Daleby

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Introduction

Daleby was a cargo ship built for Ropner Shipping Company which also had accommodation for a small number of passengers. She had a service life of 22 years and was broken up in 1972.

Daleby
Daleby - Location and date not known. [1]

Basic Data

Item Value
Type Cargo Ship
Registered owners, managers and operators Owners: Ropner Shipping Co. Ltd.
Builders Sir James Laing & Sons Ltd
Yard Deptford Yard, Sunderland
Country UK
Yard number 787
Registry London
Official number 180091
Signal letters N/K
Call sign N/K
Classification society Lloyd's Register
Gross tonnage 5,148
Net tonnage N/K
Length 127.5 Metres
Overall Length 135.7 Metres
Breadth 17.2 Metres
Depth N/K
Draught N/K
Engines Diesel engine
Engine builders N/K
Works N/K
Country N/K
Power N/K
Propulsion Single screw
Speed 12.5 knots
Cargo capacity N/K
Crew N/K
Passengers N/K
Daleby
Daleby - Location and date not known. [1]

Career Highlights

Date Event
DateEvent
22 November 1949 Launched as Daleby
June 1950 Completed
1961 Sold to Jugoslavenska Oceanska Plovidba and renamed Kupres
25 May 1972 Taken to be broken up at Split

Service History

Daleby was built for Ropners Shipping Company as one of the ships replacing the many lost during WW2. By the end of the 1950s the company was engaged in what would nowadays be called down-sizing and all of its steamships were sold by 1960. She could carry a number of passengers in addition to cargo. Accounts of some of her voyages in 1953-4 by Bill Ross who was undergoing an apprenticeship with the company - Can be found on the Benjidog Recollections website HERE.

In 1960 she was sold to Yugoslavian company Jugoslavenska Oceanska Plovidba of Kotor - now in Montenegro - and renamed Kupres after a town in what is now Bosnia/Herzegovina.

I have been unable to find specific information about how the ship was employed but I believe the Yugoslavian company was involved in tramping.

She was broken up in 1972 at Split in Croatia.

Image Credits

  1. By courtesy of The Allen Collection (another Benjidog website)
  2. By courtesy of Bill Ross