Resources

Ship Name Description
Abhona (1910) British India Passenger/Cargo ship that sunk on her maiden voyage with the loss of all hands
Adula (1937) Anglo-Saxon Petroleum tanker that served as a Merchant Aircraft Carrier in WW2
Albistan (1947) Strick Line cargo ship
Amerika (1930) East Asiatic Line passenger/cargo ship sunk by enemy action in WW2 with great loss of life
Bandar Shahpour (1927) Strick Line cargo ship named at the request of the Shah of Persia that was torpedoed in WW2.
Benedict (1930) Booth Line cargo ship with a distinguished war service and broken up in 1961.
British Merit (1942) British Tanker Co. tanker that survived a torpedo attack in WW2 and broken up in 1961.
British Success (1946) British Tanker Co. tanker broken up in 1951.
Cape Howe (1942) Cargo ship managed by Lyle that had a distinguished war service and scrapped in 1967.
Cape St. Andrew (1928) Sun Shipping Co. cargo ship that was torpedoed in WW2 with much loss of life.
Cape St. George (1928) Sun Shipping Co. cargo ship that sank during WW2 after colliding with the wreck of a ship sunk by a submarine.
City of Ely (1943) Originally a 'SAM' ship built in the USA for the UK government in WW2, she survived the war and was scrapped after a fire.
Clan Cumming (1938) A Clan Line cargo ship with a distinguished war record. Surviving air and torpedo attacks and a major explosion she was sunk by a mine.
Conakrian (1937) Cargo ship built for Elmina Ltd. and later owned by Palm Line. She had a distinguished was service and was broken up in 1968
Copthall (1922) Cargo ship originally built for E.S.Dunford as Emilie Dunford. She was broken up in 1964 after running aground
Craigavon (1921) Small Irish cargo ship built for H. Craig that was lost in a storm with all hands in 1927
Daleby (1949) Cargo ship with accommodation for passengers built for Ropners. Broken up in 1972.
Dan-Y-Bryn (1939) Cargo ship owned by Brynymor SS Co. that survived a major air raid on Hull and took part in many Arctic convoys. Broken up in 1967.
Dolabella (1939) Anglo-Saxon Petroleum tanker with an exceptional war record. Broken up in 1958.
Donaghadee (1937) The last coal-fired cargo ship built for Kelly Line of Ireland as a collier. Broken up in 1964.
Drammensfjord (1920) Cargo ship built for Norwegian Russia Line as Tatyana. She served in a large number of WW2 convoys and was broken up in 1959.
Duke of York (1935) Built as a ferry she served as a landing ship in WW2 and later survived an accident that sliced her bows off. Broken up in 1975.
El Morro (1944) A T2 tanker built for the Unitied States War Shipping Administration and later owned by British Tanker Co. and BP. Broken up in 1959.
Empire Baltic (1945) Built as a landing ship for the Royal Navy, she later became (arguably) the world's first RO-RO ferry. She took part in the Suez campaign a nd was broken up in 1962.
Empire Shepherd (1944 An 'Icemaid' type collier built for the Ministry of War Transport, she served in many convoys and finaly broken up in 1969.
Empire Unity (1927) A tanker built for German company John T. Essberger, she was captured at the outbreak off WW2 and then served in many convoys. She was broken up in 1966.
Empress of Asia (1913) A passenger/cargo ship built for Canadian Pacific Railway Co. that served in both WW1 and WW2 before being sunk by Japanese bombers while carrying 2,200 troops.
Fort Gloucester (1943) Cargo ship built in Canada and chartered to the Ministry of War Transport. She was badly damaged during the Normandy landings but survived until 1953 when she struck a rock off Trinidad.
Fort Stikine (1942) Cargo ship built in Canada and chartered to the Ministry of War Transport. She was destroyed in a major explosion in Bombay which destroyed several ships and a large part of the dock area.
Freecrest (1942) Cargo ship built for the Ministry of War Transport as Empire Austen. She served in many WW2 convoys and later had several owners and names. Broken up in 1962.
Gold Ranger (1941) Fleet support tanker of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary with an amazing service life too complex to summarise here.
King Edward (1919) Cargo ship built for the British Government at the end of WW1 but sold to British India before completion. She served in many WW2 convoys but was torpedoed in 1942 while in a convoy that was savaged by submarines.
Largs Bay (1929) Passenger/cargo ship built for the Commonwealth Government Line. She took part in many convoys, survived the war and in her latter days was used as a setting for the Titanic film 'A night to remember'. Broken up in 1957.
Linaria (1924) Stag Line cargo ship that served in many WW2 convoys but torpedoed in 1941 with the loss of the entire crew.
Lucellum (1938) Tanker built for Astrakhan SS Co. that served in many WW2 convoys and broken up in 1961.
Manistee (1932) Elders & Fyffe cargo ship that served in WW2 as an ocean boarding vessel then a fighter catapult ship. Broken up in 1960.
Neritina (1943) Anglo-Saxon Petroleum tanker that took part extensively in WW2 convoys. Broken up in 1961.
Ocean Fame (1942) Cargo ship completed for the UK Government that served extensively in WW2 convoys and in service until 1966 when she was broken up.
Ocean Vengeance (1942) Cargo ship completed for the UK Government that served extensively in WW2 convoys and in service until 1969 when she was broken up.
Opawa (1931) A cargo ship (ref) owned by New Zealand Shipping Co. that took part in many convoys but was sunk by torpedo and gunfire in 1942. The survivors suffered great hardship with only 15 reaching safety.
Oruba (1889) Pacific Steam Nav. Co. Passenger ship disguised as a capital ship in WW1 and scuttled as a breakwater in the Dardenells campaign.
Pacific Shipper (1924) Furness Withy cargo ship with a distiguished war service. Broken up in 1950.
Port Dunedin (1925) One of the first of Port Line's oil engined cargo ships with a distinguished war service that was broken up in 1962.
Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm (1908) German passenger cargo ship that remained in port throughout WW1 and handed over to the British. Used to repatriate US troops at the end of the war then served with Canadian Pacific. Broken up in 1929.
Rohilla (1906) British India passenger ship requisitioned as a hospital ship in WW1 that foundered in 1914 with great loss of life after striking rocks near Whitby and despite super-human efforts by members of the RNLI.
Sampep (1943) A US-built 'SAM' type Liberty ship that served in many convoys. Returned to US after WW2 and broken up in 1968.
San Emiliano (1939) Eagle Oil tanker that was sunk in 1942 with great loss of life and a dreadful aftermath for the survivors.
San Roberto (1922) Eagle Oil tanker that took part in an enormous number of WW2 convoys. Broken up in 1949.
Shahristan (1945) Strick Line cargo ship broken up in 1963.
Starcrest (1944) Cargo ship built as Empire Asquith for the UK Government that served in many convoys. Broken up in 1970 after several changes of name and owner.
Swiftpool (1954) Pool Shipping cargo ship broken up in 1979.
Tabaristan (1947) Strick Line cargo ship broken up in 1971.
Tuscan Star (1929) Blue Star cargo ship (ref) that survived aircraft bombing but torpedoed in 1942.
Viking Star (1920) Blue Star cargo ship (ref) that was torpedoed in 1942. The survivors faced great hardship.
Warlaby (1927) Ropner's tramp steamer sunk by enemy action in 1941.
Wendorian (1903) Steam racing yacht owned by a rich businessman and later used at as training ship at King Edward VII nautical college. Broken up in 1961
Willesden (1925) Watts & Watts cargo ship sunk by torpedo and gunfire in 1942. The crew were treated atrociously by the Japanese.
Winha (1904) Originally built for Swedish owners, taken over by Ministry of War Transport in 1941 and ultimately scuttled as a 'Gooseberry' during the Normandy Landings in 1944.